Sepia Saturday 304: God Send You Back to Me

Sepia Saturday provides bloggers with an opportunity to share their history through the medium of photographs. Historical photographs of any age or kind become the launchpad for explorations of family history, local history and social history in fact or fiction, poetry or prose, words or further images.

Today’s theme image invokes the idea of spirit images, double exposures, or other photographic manipulation. But my take today is a series of postcards that I believe my grandmother received from her cousins in England during WWI.

These postcards were published by Bamforth & Co. LTD. based in Holmfirth, West Yorkshire, England. Although more widely known for “saucy” postcards, the company also published postcards with war themes and song lyrics, among other genres. This is a series of three postcards based on the song “God Send You Back to Me.” Words by Douglas Furber; music by A. Emmett Adams; published in 1916.

Enjoy listening to the song while you peruse the postcards. If you go at a leisurely pace, you can follow along to the lyrics.

The first and the third cards in the series include an image of the one longed for.

God Send You Back to Me 1

“SONGS” SERIES NO. 5035/1

God Send You Back to Me 2

“SONGS” SERIES NO. 5035/2

This third card is the one that reminded me most of the theme image.

God Send You Back to Me 3

“SONGS” SERIES NO. 5035/3

God Send You Back to Me back

The songwriting duo of Adams and Furber is also responsible for the song “The Bells of St. Mary’s,” sung here by Bing Crosby in the movie of the same name.

If you would like a little more information about Bamforth Co., once known as the “British Hollywood of Silent Film,” you can follow the links here and here.

Please take a look at what other’s have done with today’s ghostly images at Sepia Saturday.

Sepia Saturday – Such a Face!

Sep Sat 10-31-2015Gee, I haven’t participated in Sepia Saturday in quite a while! I mean too, but my muddled brain doesn’t always cooperate. But I am here today!

Sepia Saturday provides bloggers with an opportunity to share their history through the medium of photographs. Historical photographs of any age or kind become the launchpad for explorations of family history, local history and social history in fact or fiction, poetry or prose, words or further images.

Today’s prompt is an image of a vintage Halloween greeting card. I don’t have a greeting card, but I have a couple of pictures that I think complement the theme.

Doris helps Jim HalloweenHere we have a woman standing with her back to us, right hand raised, facing a man dressed in a jacket and wearing a hat. This guy looks pretty grumpy, as does the guy on the card.

A second photo was taken a few minutes later and now we understand that this is a grumpy boy. His hat looks rather juvenile by comparison. Perhaps he grew into a grumpy man.Doris and Jim Halloween costumesThese pictures were taken while my mom and step-dad were dating – so the poem on the greeting card is also a match:

She believed in the mirror’s magic spell;
That of her future husband it would tell.
He must be tall, and good lineage trace:-
But how could he, with such a face.

I recently showed Dad this picture and he said that they went to a costume party and assumed people knew who they were, but after sitting on a couch for some time with no one speaking to them, they realized that no one had any idea who they were.

I think these are pretty great masks! I wonder where they (probably Mom) found them? This was long before the internet after all.

At the time this was taken, Mom and I lived with her parents in Ottumwa, Iowa. I’d never noticed until now that my grandfather’s hat is hanging on the back of the chair on the right.

They made quite a cute couple at Halloween – and on their wedding day!
3.Doris.Jim

It’s Halloween, so go trick-or-treating at the doors of other Sepia Saturday participants.

Rhythm and Balance

Rhythm and balance.

Requisite for dancing. Desired for living life well.

My grandmother, Eveline Coates Hoskins, is my example. There was a rhythm to her life. And there was also balance.

Her day followed a pattern:  Work. Rest/play. Work. Rest/play.

Work before play. But not work with no play.

Balance.

Rhythm.

The rhythm of her life was always andante – at a moderate tempo. I did not see her behave as I often do – frantically running around trying to catch up.

She rose and set each day at the same time. She served meals each day at the same time.

During the time I lived with my grandparents, Eveline was in her 50s. I feel certain she didn’t get to live with this much leisure as a young mother of six. Never the less – it is an example I always return to and wish to take as my own.

Eveline Hoskins in Ottumwa copy

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I’m still trying to get back to blogging after illness. It’s going much more slowly than I would like. I found that I have quite a few posts that I started once upon a time, but never finished. Like this one – started over two years ago. I’m sure I had more to add – perhaps I planned to write about the rhythm of Eveline’s week, or record my memories of how she spent her days. My intentions are long forgotten. I think I’ll go ahead a publish a few of these abandoned posts – more or less as they are. Maybe that will be just the spark I need.